Macular Degeneration
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Common Eye Disorders and Visual Impairments

Age-Related Macular Degeneration is the breaking down, or degeneration, of the macula area of the retina of the eye.

Albinism the word “albinism” refers to a group of inherited conditions. People with albinism have little or no pigment in their eyes, skin, or hair. They have inherited altered genes that do not make the usual amounts of a pigment called melanin.

Cataract is a condition in which the lens of the eye becomes dense or opaque and does not properly transmit light.

Diabetic Retinopathy is a disorder of the retina resulting from changes in the eye blood vessels and found in some people who have diabetes.

Glaucoma is a disease that impairs the optic nerve when fluid and pressure build up in the eye and damage the optic nerve.

Optic Atrophy means the loss of some (resulting in little visual change) or most (resulting in severe visual loss) of the nerve fibers in the optic nerve.

Retinitis Pigmentosa is actually the name given to a group of hereditary eye disorders, all of which involve the eye's retina, the light-sensitive nerve layer that lines the back of the eye, and all of which cause a gradual, yet progressive, loss or reduction in visual ability.

Floaters are small, semi-transparent or cloudy specks or particles within the vitreous, which is the clear, jelly-like fluid that fills the inside of your eyes. They appear as specks of various shapes and sizes, threadlike strands or cobwebs.

Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. People with dry eyes either do not produce enough tears or have a poor quality of tears. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.

Presbyopia is a vision condition in which the crystalline lens of your eye loses its flexibility, which makes it difficult for you to focus on close objects.
Presbyopia may seem to occur suddenly, but the actual loss of flexibility takes place over a number of years.

Color vision deficiency is the inability to distinguish certain shades of color or in more severe cases, see colors at all. The term "color blindness" is also used to describe this visual condition, but very few people are completely color blind.

Ocular hypertension is an increase in the pressure in your eyes that is above the range considered normal with no detectable changes in vision or damage to the structure of your eyes. The term is used to distinguish people with elevated pressure from those with glaucoma, a serious eye disease that causes damage to the optic nerve and vision loss.

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